Top 5 Books About Satsuma Pottery

By | March 27, 2010

We all love to read about Satsuma Pottery and there are many books available that will teach you about the makers, the markings and the process used to make this kind of pottery.  Also, people have their favorite kinds of books too.  Some will opt for a proper antiques guide, offering prices and tips on choosing a good and authentic piece, but others will want to know as much of the Japanese history behind the items as they can.  Learning the information about where the pieces cam from can make owning or collecting them so much more rewarding.

Here at the Satsuma Pottery site, we want to help people get involved in the history and the background of the people that made the pieces.  The time when these vases and buttons were made was hard and people were very poor.  Making pottery was an excellent skill to have, as was the ability to illustrate the pieces.  Those who were fortunate enough to work, making these masterpieces, were the ones how were able to have a better standard of living in early Japan.

These books will tell you about Satsuma Pottery, but also about the times they were made and the people who were involved.  From warlords to emperors, the history of Satsuma is very rich, so choose a book and enjoy.  The books are also good for noting the different styles and signatures of the makers, which will help you know if the pieces you have are of any real value as antiques.

1. Imari, Satsuma and Other Japanese Export Ceramics

Imari, Satsuma and Other Japanese Export CeramicsThe popularity of Japanese ceramics in the West caused a vast and delightful variety of wares to be made in the late nineteenth century for export. Colorful Imari porcelain in deep blue, orange-red, and gold, Fukagawa porcelain in imaginative designs, as well as the softly colored Satsuma earthenwares, are the best known of the old Japanese exports, shown here in hundreds of variations created by skilled decorators. This new edition has an updated values reference and additional items shown in each chapter, especially early Imari wares from the period c. 1700. Also presented are the exotic Sumida and Banko wares, relative newcomers to the field whose popularity has grown steadily over the last ten years. Makers' and decorators' marks, unusual shapes, design variations, and hard-to-find examples are all shown in 600 color photographs with identifying captions and concise text.
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2. Treasures of Imperial Japan: Ceramics from the Khalili Collection (Nasser D. Khalili Collection of J

Treasures of Imperial Japan: Ceramics from the Khalili Collection (Nasser D. Khalili Collection of JFull-colour catalogue of an exhibition of 98 items of japanese ceramics by Meiji artists such as Makuzu Kozan and Yabu Meizan.
buy Treasures of Imperial Japan: Ceramics from the Khalili Collection (Nasser D. Khalili Collection of J on Amazon

3. Meiji Ceramics: The Art of Japanese Export Porcelain and Satsuma Ware 1868-1912

Meiji Ceramics: The Art of Japanese Export Porcelain and Satsuma Ware 1868-1912Pressure exerted by America in 1854 caused Japan to open its doors after 260 years of isolation. Wide receptiveness to everything Western was the driving force behind the modernization of Japan initiated by the Meiji government, yet it also induced a rapid rediscovery of indigenous cultural values. At early Paris and London international exhibitions, the Japanese decorative and applied arts sparked off the Western fascination with all things Japanese japonisme. In Japan, on the other hand, new technologies were eagerly adopted the government realized that increasing production for export would be an excellent means of promoting Japanese economic growth and thus enhancing Japan's status worldwide. Meiji Ceramics represents the first in-depth study of the development of Japanese export porcelain against a highly charged background of political, economic and cultural factors. Includes 180 artists's signatures. Text in English.
buy Meiji Ceramics: The Art of Japanese Export Porcelain and Satsuma Ware 1868-1912 on Amazon

4. Collector's Encyclopedia of Pickard China: With Additional Sections on All Chicago China Studios

Collector's Encyclopedia of Pickard China: With Additional Sections on All Chicago China StudiosThis book documents and illustrates over 1,000 pieces of china, the Pickard trademarks, and old advertising with color photos and current collector values. It also includes over 150 brief artist biographies, patent information, a bibliography, and the various china associations. All known antique pattern names, as well as popular designs of anonymity are listed, many patterns never before identified. Due to the lack of a source of information on Pickard china, Alan Reed has devoted a decade of research on his own -- through interviews, letters, papers, U.S. Census records, and through other collectors. The history of the other Chicago studios and the artists from the 'golden era' (between 1894 and 1925) of handpainted china are included. 2000 values. REVIEW: Over 800 photos with no repeats from Book I are featured in this collector's guide. It's divided into six collectible categories: early years (1700 - 1875), cabinet cups, nineteenth & twentieth century, English bone china, miniatures, and figurals. A marks section, helpful appendix, and bibliography are included, as well as useful tips for dealers and collectors. -Robert Clayton
buy Collector's Encyclopedia of Pickard China: With Additional Sections on All Chicago China Studios on Amazon

5. MEIJI NO TAKARA: TREASURES OF IMPERIAL JAPAN: Ceramics Part Two: Earthenware (The Nasser D. Khalili

MEIJI NO TAKARA: TREASURES OF IMPERIAL JAPAN: Ceramics Part Two: Earthenware (The Nasser D. Khalili The second of two volumes on ceramics, this book covers earthenware and focuses on another great artist-entrepreneur, Yabu Meizan (1853-1934), and illustrates 168 of his earthenwares and those of his contemporaries and imitators, minutely decorated in enamels and gold over a characteristic crackled ground. This volume of the Collection is sold with a free copy of Volume I: Selected Essays.
buy MEIJI NO TAKARA: TREASURES OF IMPERIAL JAPAN: Ceramics Part Two: Earthenware (The Nasser D. Khalili  on Amazon

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